March 26, 2019

This was originally an assignment in a midwifery course. I've shared my thoughts here in hopes it helps other birth workers serve all birthing people with dignity and thoughtfulness. To read the original format of the assignment and/or references, click here

Abstract

Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. This is true despite the availability of uterotonic medications and standardized protocols of active management of third stage labor (AMTSL). There is a lack of universally accepted definitions of terms related to PPH and AMTSL. Additionally, conflicting research exists on the safety and efficacy of these medications among specific populations, which has led to great variation in protocol recommendations. Finally, there are concerns among scholars and practitioners that PPH prevention practices are informed by decades of research solely focused on pharmacologically influenced birth. These factors preclude thorough understandi...

March 25, 2019

This was originally an assignment in a midwifery course. I've shared my thoughts here in hopes it helps other birth workers serve all birthing people with dignity and thoughtfulness. To read the original format of the assignment and/or references, click here

A particularly intriguing birth model is that of a simple triad of support consisting of an obstetrician, midwife, and doula as presented by Ricardo Jones. When reading Jones’ chapter, three major themes common among successful models of birth are apparent. First and foremost, evidence-based practice is key, which can be understood as the place where client values, provider experience/opinion, and quality research intersect. Not only does Jones make specific mention of evidence-based medicine being an important component to his career, he also absorbs and applies others’ works, papers, and data around evidence-based birth in order to improve his practice (Jones, 2009). 

The second prominent theme is that of a patient-centered...

March 24, 2019

This was originally an assignment in a midwifery course. I've shared my thoughts here in hopes it helps other birth workers serve all birthing people with dignity and thoughtfulness. To read the original format of the assignment and/or references, click here.

           With fewer than 1% of all U.S. births occurring at home, it is fair to say that home birth is a rare occurrence. However, home birth rates have been on the rise across the nation since the mid-2000s, indicating a trend for out-of-hospital birth experiences (Cheyney et al., 2014). In recent years, domestic and international research on the safety of home birth has gained in both quantity and quality; this provides an opportunity for pinpointing ideal candidates as well as the specific factors that make home birth safe. Thus far, researchers have identified home birth as a safe option for low-risk birthers seeking normal physiologic birth under the care of professionally competent providers who emp...

March 23, 2019

This was originally an assignment in a midwifery course. I've shared my thoughts here in hopes it helps other birth workers serve all birthing people with dignity and thoughtfulness. To read the original format of the assignment and/or references, click here

       

        The current state of U.S. maternity care is reflective of the more general picture of current American society. At first glance, a system with the purported goals of equitable health and prosperity seems to be working toward meeting the needs of a population. Yet, a little investigation results in the uncovering of a haphazard assembly of people and institutions whose actual impact is dangerous to anyone the least bit vulnerable. Low-income people, those with lower education levels, and people of color are all at risk in the maternity care system, just as they are in society as a whole. Due in large part to the racist foundations and history of American culture, racial and ethnic m...

March 22, 2019

This was originally an assignment in a midwifery course. I've shared my thoughts here in hopes it helps other birth workers serve all birthing people with dignity and thoughtfulness. To read the original format of the assignment and/or references, click here

A recurring theme in the Equity and Anti-Oppression course this term is that of the allostatic load carried by underprivileged groups. It is evident from multiple required reading and video sources that stress can have a long-lasting impact on the lives of the gestational parent, the fetus, and the generations that follow. For instance, Thomas et al. (2014), in Section II, identified chronic stress and stress during pregnancy for low-income families as impacting health factors such as obesity, gestational weight gain, and depression. In their study, 80% of the pregnant, low-income participants cited moderate or high stress levels with issues such as financial struggle, housing and job insecurity, relationship conflicts, and anxiet...

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