March 23, 2019

This was originally an assignment in a midwifery course. I've shared my thoughts here in hopes it helps other birth workers serve all birthing people with dignity and thoughtfulness. To read the original format of the assignment and/or references, click here

       

        The current state of U.S. maternity care is reflective of the more general picture of current American society. At first glance, a system with the purported goals of equitable health and prosperity seems to be working toward meeting the needs of a population. Yet, a little investigation results in the uncovering of a haphazard assembly of people and institutions whose actual impact is dangerous to anyone the least bit vulnerable. Low-income people, those with lower education levels, and people of color are all at risk in the maternity care system, just as they are in society as a whole. Due in large part to the racist foundations and history of American culture, racial and ethnic m...

March 22, 2019

This was originally an assignment in a midwifery course. I've shared my thoughts here in hopes it helps other birth workers serve all birthing people with dignity and thoughtfulness. To read the original format of the assignment and/or references, click here

A recurring theme in the Equity and Anti-Oppression course this term is that of the allostatic load carried by underprivileged groups. It is evident from multiple required reading and video sources that stress can have a long-lasting impact on the lives of the gestational parent, the fetus, and the generations that follow. For instance, Thomas et al. (2014), in Section II, identified chronic stress and stress during pregnancy for low-income families as impacting health factors such as obesity, gestational weight gain, and depression. In their study, 80% of the pregnant, low-income participants cited moderate or high stress levels with issues such as financial struggle, housing and job insecurity, relationship conflicts, and anxiet...

September 22, 2018

This was originally an assignment in a midwifery course. I've shared my thoughts here in hopes it helps other birth workers serve all birthing people with dignity and thoughtfulness. To read the original format of the assignment and/or references, click here

       

I believe that the poor maternal and infant outcomes of the United States will remain wholly unchanged if birth does not rapidly shift to out-of-hospital settings with midwives as primary care providers. Access to midwives and home births is inherently intertwined with social justice in birth and reproductive rights. Globally and locally, the most egregious and preventable traumas take place where birth is primarily occurring away from the homes and communities in which birthers live. It also seems to me that the more advanced the medical system one exists within, the more likely birth-related trauma is to happen.

This is partially due to ill-informed and misinformed consumers who have exp...

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